by Lisa Wu March 17, 2020 4 min read

Red String Bracelet Meaning According to Different Cultures

Have you seen people wearing a red string bracelet recently? You might even have noticed the red string bracelet celebrities wear, just like in pop icon Madonna’s wrist.

Red string bracelets have been gaining popularity as a fashion trend in the last few years. But more than being just a fashion trend, did you know that these red strings have a deeper meaning in various cultures?

Some people wear them to “meet” their destined halves. Others wear them for religious purposes, while some put on red stings to attract luck and protect themselves from evil.

Wearing red strings could mean different things. Here, let’s explore the deeper meaning of red string bracelet in the following cultures.

 

Chinese

Red String Bracelet - Chinese

In Chinese traditions, the red string is seen as the “string of fate.” It is believed to be an invisible thread that binds together individuals who are destined to be married.

Ancient beliefs tell that each of us is fated to be with another person. We all have soulmates that we are bound to meet and stay with for a long time.

And the red string serves as that connection, leading us to the right person.

But the Chinese red string bracelet meaning doesn’t stop there. Aside from the idea of meeting your predestined individual, the red string also connects us to people who will create a significant impact on our lives. This can be our parents, siblings, and friends.

  • Feng shui red bracelet meaning: In feng shui, you might have noticed a lot of charms tied in red string. This is because the color red is a “cure” that bless people with good luck and fortune.

Aside from being a cure, red strings also serve as protection from evil. They are also used to magnify intentions for fulfilling your utmost desires.

 

Buddhism

Red String Bracelet - Buddhism

Just like in feng shui, the color red is also symbolic in Buddhism. Red is a symbol of life force that directly impacts one’s life. This color also represents courage and compassion.

During meditation, Buddhists use red strings to detach themselves from worldly attractions. This helps them achieve focus.

In Tibetan Buddhism, people tie the red thread bracelet around their wrists during religious ceremonies. A Buddhist leader called Lama usually blesses the strings by reciting mantras. Then, he gives them out to his students.

This practice is believed to bring people together as well as marking the occasion of taking religious vows.

Buddhist monks may also give the red string bracelets they use to commoners as a sign of blessing and protection.

 

Hinduism

Red String Bracelet - Hinduism

In Hinduism, red strings are called “kautuka.” Hindus wear them on the wrist to uphold the sanctity of their religion. It also shows that they observe the Hindu way of life.

Red strings are viewed as a sacred symbol, and they are used in many religious ceremonies and significant occasions.

When people tie red strings on their wrist, they feel connected to each other. Hence, the act denotes the unity in faith of Hindus despite their individual differences.

During religious functions called puja, a Hindu priest wears a red string as he performs a sacred ritual. He also gives red strings to devotees who attend the ceremony to remind them that they participate in the sacred act.

Men and unmarried women wear the strings on the right wrist while married women wear them on the left.

 

Kabbalah

Red String Bracelet - Kabbalah

In the Jewish mystical interpretation of the Bible, Kabbalah, a red string bracelet is tied on the left wrist to protect its wearer from evil. The left wrist is considered the “receptive” part of the body.

According to Hebrew texts, a red string must be tied around a certain tomb to gain mystical powers. This originated from the story of Rachel, the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, known as the ultimate mother figure who protected her children from all odds.

In the story, Rachel tried to give birth for years. However, she was unsuccessful. She was believed to be infertile, but this changed when she gave birth to her firstborn, Joseph.

After giving birth to her second child, Benjamin, Rachel died. But her highest priority was to keep her sons safe from all evils, so she is deemed as a holy mother figure.

Rachel’s diligence in her prayers has fulfilled her wish of having children. This story has led to the belief that tying a red string seven times around Rachel’s tomb infuses it with the energy of luck and protection.

Kabbalists believe that wearing red strings can protect you from the “evil eye,” which causes negative energies to enter your life. Red string bracelets serve as protection against the harm of evil eye.

 

Final Words

In modern times, wearing a red string bracelet may seem like a fashion trend. But it goes deeper than that.

There is a rich meaning of red string bracelet tied around various cultures. Before you jump on this trend, it is best that you learn the implications of wearing a red string bracelet.

 

Want to have your own red string bracelet? Check out our collection below!

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